Friday, November 24, 2017

Saturday, February 6, 2016

Design Thinking

Solution-based thinking[edit]

Design thinking is a formal method for practical, creative resolution of problems and creation of solutions, with the intent of an improved future result. In this regard it is a form of solution-based, or solution-focused thinking – starting with a goal (a better future situation) instead of solving a specific problem. By considering both present and future conditions and parameters of the problem, alternative solutions may be explored simultaneously. Nigel Cross asserted that this type of thinking most often happens in the built, or artificial, environment (as in artifacts).[10]
This approach differs from the analytical scientific method, which begins with thoroughly defining all the parameters of the problem in order to create a solution. Design thinking identifies and investigates with both known and ambiguous aspects of the current situation in order to discover hidden parameters and open alternative paths which may lead to the goal. Because design thinking is iterative, intermediate "solutions" are also potential starting points of alternative paths, including redefining of the initial problem.

Wednesday, January 6, 2016

~ Bill Moggridge

Few people think about it or are aware of it. But there is nothing made by human beings that does not involve a design decision somewhere.

Design Rules ~ The Power of Modularity

"An understanding of the forces driving change is crucial to comprehending the opportunities and the risks that change creates. But in our search for understanding, we must be prepared to dig deep, for the forces that matter are rooted in the very nature of things, and in the processes used to create them. What we see around us is not the result of some deus ex machina working outside of our influence or control. Human beings, working as individuals and in groups, create the new technologies, the new forms of organization, the new products and markets. To be sure, the consequences of their actions are not always intended or even anticipated. But the" things" themselves - the tangible objects, the devices, the software programs, the production processes, the contracts, the firms and markets - are the fruit of purposeful action. They are "designed."

Hat tip ~ Design Rules - The Power of Modularity, Carliss Y. Baldwin & Kim B. Clark

Thursday, November 19, 2015

Harrison Ford from his classic Big Think interview...

"I think the basis of acting is empathy. I have always thought that, knowing how other people feel."